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 THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATE AND ADVANCED STUDIES

  • TU-K/IUPAC workshop on chemical risk assessment in 2016
    TU-K/IUPAC workshop on chemical risk assessment in 2016

    TU-K/IUPAC workshop on chemical risk assessment in 2016

  • Space research: influence of gravity on growth and development of plant species
    Space research: influence of gravity on growth and development of plant species

    Space research: influence of gravity on growth and development of plant species

  • Postgraduate research facilities in DCST (HPLC)
    Postgraduate research facilities in DCST (HPLC)

    Postgraduate research facilities in DCST (HPLC)

  • Postgraduate research facilities in DCST (AAS)
    Postgraduate research facilities in DCST (AAS)

    Postgraduate research facilities in DCST (AAS)

  • TU-K / TUM/ HELMHOLTZ  MOU meeting in 2014
    TU-K / TUM/ HELMHOLTZ MOU meeting in 2014

    TU-K / TUM/ HELMHOLTZ  MOU meeting in 2014

The School of Graduate and Advanced Studies (SGAS) is responsible for coordination and management of postgraduate and advanced study programmes within the university.

The School's Vision

The vision of the School is to ensure that high quality postgraduate curricula are developed in various disciplines, in line with the university and Commission for University Education (CUE) policy guidelines and academic standards are maintained in postgraduate teaching and research.


Research Collaboration between DGSE TU-K and the University of California, Global Health Institute

A visit by a Postdoctoral Researcher from the University of California Global Health Institute (UCGHI) GloCal Health Fellowship programme, Dr Amber Roegner, on a postdoctoral fellowship tenable at the Technical University of Kenya under the mentorship of Dr Lewis Sitoki, Chairman, Department of Geosciences and the Environment (DGSE). The researcher will be studying the ‘Role of Cyanobacterial Blooms and Snail Vectors in Schistosomiasis Epidemiology of Fishing Communities at Lake Victoria, Kenya between 2015 and 2016.’ This project is funded to the tune of USD $20,000.

Dr Amber Roegner and her colleague, Dr Jessica Corman from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA, gave a seminar on ‘Water, Women & Fisheries: Addressing Two Ecological Realities Impacting Human Health at Lake Victoria” on 7th October 2016 in Block N room 219. Two other talks were given by Dr Sitoki on ‘Characterization of spatial-temporal health risks from seasonal cyanobacterial blooms in Kisumu Bay’, and Richard Oruko Ongong, a PhD student in DGSE on the topic, “Bioremediation of tannery-based Chromiun IV complexes in soils near dumpsites in Kenya”. The results obtained so far, by Dr Sitoki and his team, indicate that adverse health effect risks of Lake Victoria pollution to subsistence communities may even be higher than those caused to the municipality of Kisumu and therefore local community-based interventions are needed. Phytoplankton diversity information and remote sensing through GIS, using cyanobacterial pigments, may provide significant means to predict health risk from blooms and prioritize resources and efforts in community-based interventions.

Among the key findings presented during the seminar were documentation of point and non-point sources of pollution, GIS -remote sensed data for cyanobacterial quantification and ground-truthing with field counts and identification as well as the observed seasonal variation in indicator counts and cyanotoxins in community source water. Cyanobacterial cell counts were consistently determined at levels likely to result in adverse acute reactions (> 100,000 to 10,000,000 cells/ml), and microcystins were consistently detected well above 1 µg/L in some sites. The seminar attracted a large number of TU-K staff from the Faculty of Applied Sciences and Technology as well as postgraduate and undergraduate students (see group photo). It was opened by Prof. J.O. Lalah, Director, SGAS & Acting Director, School of Physical Sciences and Technology. The audience was really motivated and Dr. Sitoki and the postdoctoral researchers promised to give another seminar at a later date.